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“The good news for sociology majors is that your studies are uniquely suited to help you develop the skills you need for a successful 21st century career.  Sociologists study social change, diverse communities and their interactions, and they use scientific methods to find empirical answers to complex questions.  Studying sociology can help you foster your creativity, innovation, critical thinking, analytic problem solving and communication skills.”-- American Sociological Association. 2013. 21st Century Careers with an Undergraduate Degree in Sociology.

BELOW ARE ANSWERS FROM SOME OF OUR GRADUATES TO QUESTIONS ABOUT THEIR EXPERIENCE OF STUDYING SOCIOLOGY AT MCMURRY.

 

MATT ACKLIN

Why did you end up majoring in sociology?  I started out majoring in Exercise and Sports Science with a teaching degree at Texas Tech.  After transferring to McM, I took a sociology class with Dr. Wallace.  This class helped me to better understand the makeup of the world we live in.  It helped open my eyes to different areas that I may not have been exposed to with another degree.  And a major in sociology does not limit a person with his/her career choice.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry?  When I was at McM, I had the best professors. Professors that took the time to guide you, and mentor you.  Professors that made class enjoyable, made class interesting, and were able to communicate with the students so that a subject was understood.   

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this?  Because of the wide range of career opportunities that a major in sociology offers. The variety of classes to take.  Sociology is a part of our everyday lives.  I believe having a sociology background as helped me to be more open minded and has helped me to be a more rounded person.

What is your current occupation? How are you using sociology in your work? Taylor County Adult Probation Officer.  Persons placed on probation come from all types of backgrounds, ie: ethnic, race, gender, age, pro social values, antisocial values, low income, middle class, and high income.  Having a sociology background as helped me better supervise offenders based on their sociological situation and hopefully in turn the offender will not reoffend.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education? If so, discuss the area you pursued. How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? I have not furthered my education.

CYNTHIA ALVIDREZ

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I have always been interested in how much one's society can affect they ways in which they will behave. I felt like majoring in Sociology would shed some light on just why people behave the way they do.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? I enjoyed every minute of my studies at McMurry University!!. The professors were hands down the best instructors I have had a chance to meet!! Dr. Wallace and Hollingsworth are by far the greatest and most understanding professors!! I feel privileged to have studied under such talented individuals.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? It's the best Major on campus!!

What is your current occupation? How are you using sociology in your work?  I am currently a victim's advocate at Noah Project. Sociology is allowing me to see things from my client's perspective by taking into account their economic status and ethnic background and figure out how these are affecting their current situation.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education? If so, discuss the area you pursued. How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? I am currently enrolled in Texas Tech's Master of Vocational Rehabilitation Program. I have pursued this particular career field because of my interest in disabilities and the impact they have one's ability to seek and maintain suitable employment. Majoring in Sociology was able to provide me with the firm foundation I needed to grow personally and professionally!!

CLAY BAGGETT

Why did you end up majoring in sociology?  It was by chance. I was a senior and studying business. I wasn’t doing well in the Advanced Business Classes. I noticed Dr. Wallace’s Class, and noticed that the students were actually enjoying themselves. I looked into sociology, and liked what I saw. I changed my major, and really am glad I did so.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? My experience was good. I was an untraditional student. If I had a chance to do it over again, I would have got more involved in McMurry.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? A student should major in sociology if they enjoy basic sociology classes, and want to be able to work with people. They also need to be a caring person that is not driven by money, but rather helping people.

What is your current occupation? How are you using sociology in your work? I am a truck driver. Sociology has taught me many valuable lessons that you can use in any work setting.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor?  I have not furthered my education.

SHAUN BUSTILLOS

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I have always been interested in the study of people; sociology just seemed like the right fit. To learn how every aspect of everyday life can affect the outcome of a person and to study how we can make changes in a positive way is just awesome.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? Very fulfilling! As a non-traditional student I was a bit nervous to attend college, but the professors and students were great! Since our class size was much smaller than larger campuses it made it a more enjoyable learning experience. We were able to include the whole group and get to know each other on a more personal level where we were able to express our ideas and grow as a group.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? Where do you not use sociology on an everyday basis? Any job or group setting you will need to learn about people and what makes them tick. How culture, race and their economic background will affect how someone is seen in society. If you know how to understand all of this then you can better understand people and build on those relationships. It is the foundation for any career where you interact with people.

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? Currently I am working at the Regional Victims Crisis Center. I use sociology in almost all of my experience with those we administer to in our community. What a great way to help someone if you can better understand where they are coming from. We work with all age groups, in the schools and various venues in the community to assist them with their needs when they have a crisis, or better yet, before it happens.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? I have decided not to further my education in a college. Since working with this agency I have been able to further my education with many seminars, workshops and community involvement that has allowed me to expand on what my degree and many years of experience in the military has given me.

MARJORIE CLOUD

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? As a non-traditional student wanting to prepare for a career in social services, sociology offered an excellent foundation.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? Excellent.  Smaller classes offered more time for open discussion on subject matter.   I particularly enjoyed exploring academic theories within the scope of real life experiences.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology.  Why should he or she do this? For an undergraduate student, Sociology provides a solid foundation to understanding issues that deal with the individual and his or her relationships as they interact within our society.   No matter the chosen professional field, sociology will provide concepts that better equip them to deal with individuals, families and organizations within our society.

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? Donor Relations Coordinator with the West Texas Rehabilitation Center.  Working in a non-profit organization, you are often interacting with individuals, families and organizations.  In my position, I am dealing with donors and volunteers who believe in our organization’s mission of service.  It’s important to be able to relate to an individual’s need or purpose to help others and the role that plays in their sense of well-being within the scope of our society.  

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued. How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? I completed a Master of Science degree in Social Service Administration which focuses on working in non-profit organizations. While non-profit organizations are not unlike for-profit businesses in some ways… they are also unique and different from the standard business world.  Non-profits have a primary focus on providing a product to better our society which usually starts on the individual level often extending to the family and telescoping out into the community.  Socio-economic, health and religion are some areas that non-profits are often associated with on local, state and national levels.  Sociology expands your awareness of how individual needs are affected by social order and priorities. 

BRANDON CRAWFORD

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I originally took Introduction to Sociology to fill a general education requirement. I had never heard of sociology but several friends told me it was an interesting… and easy class. Now that I am teaching a section of Introduction to Sociology I realize these both are very common reason ha! From the very beginning of our introduction to the sociological imagination it LOVED sociology. A lot of what I learned made sense, addressed questions I’d often wondered about, and/or explained things I had noticed but never taken the time to further explore. I changed my minor to sociology so that I could take more classes and then before I knew it I was a full blown sociology major!

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? I cannot speak highly enough about my experience of studying sociology at McMurry. Every professor I had presented sociology in such a manner that there was no denying their love for the discipline. This combined with the content of classes proved to be too infectious to overcome. The quality of education at McMurry is excellent as well. Two year after graduating I entered graduate school and the education I received at McMurry provided the foundation needed to be successful. Dr. Wallace and Dr. Hollingsworth are also just great individuals outside of the classroom. Whether it was class related, personal problems, or just wanting to visit, they were never too busy. In addition to them both being great professors, they are also just great people. Since leaving McMurry, both have continued to stay in contact and maintain interest in both my wellbeing and sociological career. One of my fondest memories at McMurry is my family graduation dinner because Dr. Wallace took the time to come out and celebrate and meet my family.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? To any prospective students in sociology at McMurry all I can say is do it! I can say with complete confidence that majoring in Sociology at McMurry is one of the best and most important decisions I’ve made in my life. It has been life changing. Beyond being interesting, sociology is applicable in so many different areas, both professionally and personally. In addition to all that you gain from the discipline itself, there is also much to be gained from the professors themselves. They care about their students and continue to invest time in them both personally and academically. 

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? I am currently a 3rd year Ph.D. student and graduate instructor in sociology at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma. Additionally I am a research assistant Oklahoma’s Department of Human Services’ Office of Planning Research and Statistics and a 2014-2015 Oklahoma Policy Institute Research Fellow. Sociology is a HUGE part of my work. All three of my occupations use sociology to inform and design research. My current research uses a sociological lens to investigate gender and child maltreatment cases, risks of youth homelessness for youth who have aged out of foster care, abortion opinions, and the history of the death penalty. Upon completing my Ph.D., I plan on teaching at the university level. I hope that in my current and future teaching I present sociology with the same passion that my professors at McMury did.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? Since graduating from McMurry I received my Master of Arts in Sociology from the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas and I am currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma. My education at McMurry has been pivotal to my higher education experience. Throughout my post-McMurry educational endeavors I have continued to remain in contact with Dr. Wallace and Dr. Hollingsworth thru e-mail, conferences, and even occasional run-ins at half marathons. Dr. Hollingsworth also served as a committee member for my thesis and was a guest speaker for an Alpha Kappa Delta ceremony in Arkansas.

TODD DUQUETTE

Why did you end up majoring in sociology?  At the time I was deciding on what to major in at college, I was enlisted into the United States Air Force performing duties as a military police officer.  I was fortunate enough to travel the world and witness firsthand the many different cultures and beliefs.  I found it intriguing that what's considered to be acceptable practice in one society may not be acceptable by another society.  I wanted to learn more about the social and cultural factors influencing people's values and beliefs.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? I found studying sociology at McMurry University to be very captivating.  Each sociology professor had their own unique spin to the course of study, making every class fun and exciting.  They opened my eyes to a whole new world and introduced me to an entirely new way of thinking.  Sociology has changed my worldview, I now look at everything from a different perspective.

Let's say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? Sociology is a fascinating area of study dealing with people.  The social world around us is ever changing.  Sociology will help you to better understand how our social world operates; you'll learn it's organization and structure.  Sociology will help you learn and understand the nexus between your life, the area you live in, and the rest of world!

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? I am a United States Air Force military police officer.  I utilized my learned skills in sociology to help me better see and analyze the connections with criminal incidents, trends, and social problems.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? I have not furthered my education because I am content with my degree.  I have five awesome children, and will save my money so they can attend college too.

MORGAN BROOKE (ALLEN) EDDY

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I chose to major in sociology because I found it very interesting. Sociology presented a novel way of thinking and examining the world.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? Studying sociology at McMurry helped to develop the foundation of my life perspective. It forced me out of my comfort zone by requiring me to re-examine the way I viewed the world. Broadening my outlook and perspective has prepared me to adapt and succeed in our diverse and complex social world.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry studentwho is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? Societal structures are fluid and dynamic. Studying sociology will help you understand how society shapes your world view and how you help shape society. It will help you develop critical thinking skills that can be extremely useful as you continue your education and as you enter the workforce.

What is your current occupation? How areyou using sociology in your work? I currently work at the University of Texas at Dallas as a Team Lead in their Admissions Department. Sociology is provides me with the tools and foundation to better understand the members of the team I lead. It also helps as we look at admissions data and prepare to set and reach goals.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education? If so, discuss the area you pursued. How did your sociology degree help you with this endeavor? Yes. I graduated with a Master’s of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies with a Concentration in Women’s Studies from the University of North Texas. (It’s a ridiculously long degree name, I know.) My sociology degree was extremely helpful as I furthered my education. It provided me with a solid foundation for delving deeper in the sociological issues that are presented in Women’s Studies.

LEESA (FREY) FREEMAN

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? Mainly because I enjoyed it. I've always loved people watching, studying their motivations and interests, and trying to understand why they do what they do. Sociology helped me gain more insight into the inner-workings of people, which to me is absolutely fascinating!

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? It's funny, there are entire classes I know I took – I had to to graduate – that I do not remember, but that's not true for my sociology classes. While I don't remember every lecture, I do vividly recall the overarching themes. I remember the discussions, the feedback, and deep knowing that was I was learning was truly important. The professors I had not only knew their stuff, they knew how to impart that knowledge in ways that stuck with me.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? Sociology is a stepping stone to wherever you end up. Unlike a computer major, for instance, that has an obvious career choice, sociology is broader in scope. That said, sociology is a major that opens your eyes to possibilities. It gives you a myriad of choices for the future, because you learn to appreciate and understand not just why people behave as they do, but how you can better work with them.

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? I'm an author, and I use sociology just about every single day. I have to understand how a character would react to the world around him and why. I have to search for the deep-seated feelings, motivations, and fears we all share, then write it in a way that is believable and (hopefully) moves the reader. I have to search for the dynamics between characters, the conflicts they are struggling with, and the ingrained beliefs that serve to derail getting what they want. All those things boil down to Who we are as human beings, which is ultimately what sociology is really all about.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor?  I haven't. 

 

CHELSEA GRIFFITH

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I came to McMurry intending to major in Business, swearing never to change my mind.  I took the Soc 1300 class as a general education requirement.  I really liked it and thought I would take one more Sociology class to fulfill another general education requirement.  I didn't know that sociology existed prior to coming to McMurry, but I knew that I wouldn't just do well in my classes, but I would be happy with whatever career I chose if it meant working with people intimately.  

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? Studying at McMurry was great!  The one time I thought I would get away without reading the entire book assigned for class, I couldn't put it down.  All the reading material is relevant and engaging.  I enjoyed the small classes so that I could connect with my professors.  

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? Go for it!  Sociology is a degree that you can use in just about any career field.  The knowledge you obtain in the classroom is applicable to just about anything.  And the classroom discussions are the most interesting of any other subject offered.

What is your current occupation? How are you using sociology in your work? I spent six months in India after graduating from McMurry.  Dr. Hollingsworth was a constant support in my education while I was overseas.  He gave me insight on the country even though I was no longer his student.  Dr. Wallace taught me about the Summer Slide while in Social Stratification.  I made all the children at the home where I worked and lived read to me on a regular basis just because I knew that one-on-one attention is so crucial.  The classwork is extremely applicable.  

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? I am currently enrolled in the Master of Social Work Program at Asbury University in Wilmore, KY and will graduate in May 2016.  I know how to study which is quite possibly the biggest challenge one would have in graduate school.  Dr. Wallace and Dr. Hollingsworth helped me see my passion outside of the classroom by supporting a fundraiser to end local and global hunger.  I am now studying so that I can use my "extra-curricular activity in my spare time" to be able to do that as my career.   

JAYNE HARRISON

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I took one sociology class an elective and ended up loving it. I had taken psychology classes before and they always taught about how the mind works, but sociology taught me about the cultural aspects that shape an individual. 

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? The sociology department was small when I attended but all the professors were extremely helpful in guiding in the classroom as well as outside of it. I was able to come to my professors with advice on graduate school and career advice, 

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? Sociology is tool that can help benefit anyone, no matter the occupation. In order to understand and work with a diverse group of people, you need to understand the cultural and social aspects that shape them. Sociology helps you to understand that, 

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? I am a Food Service Manager in Healthcare Hospital. I have to work with a diverse group of people and sociology helped give me an understanding of all the different backgrounds.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? Sociology helped prepare me for graduate school. We learn not only about different cultural aspects but wrote a lot and were required to think critically Since graduating from McMurry, I have gone to pursue an MBA at Texas Woman's University.

REENA KRISHNAN

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? During my first year in college, I had anticipated the Introduction to Sociology class eagerly, interested, yet unsure of what to expect. The course turned out to be the one that answered all my uncertainties regarding career direction and proved to be much more than a “run of the mill” class. Dr. Robert Wallace was definitely the professor who had me thinking in the sociology frame of mind and his novel methods had a profound impact.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? While we learned many sociological theories and differing schools of thought, I also found it to be very “hands on.” The lectures were balanced by the many serious in depth discussions, debates, and readings on numerous subjects such as: race and ethnicity, sociology of religion, social stratification and white collar crime. I found the fieldwork papers to be especially enlightening. For example, for a norm violation report, students were required to break a rule deemed deviant from what is considered the norm in society. I chose mismatched shoes on each foot to see what sort of comments it would bring. The following week when I returned with matched shoes, Dr. Wallace passed by me on campus commenting rather loudly that I had finally worn the correct shoes. This elicited a number of questioning stares from passersby. There were several more norm violation reports.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? I feel that majoring in sociology gives one better awareness about the society and world he or she lives in. The subject matter can possibly give a greater rise to empathy. I think people of all demographics have a story to tell, and studying sociology gives one the opportunity to speak on issues that matter, while also having the opportunity to hear and possibly be open to other viewpoints. Majoring in sociology also gives one a platform not only for a career as a sociologist, but several other professions as well.

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? I currently work in a private, college prep school in the Early Childhood Center sector with mainly three to four year olds, actually the same school I attended. As cliché as it sounds what I love about what I do is: I have the opportunity to mold young minds each and every day. It may be a life lesson, or it may be an educational tool. My hope is: it can be carried on to serve him or her for the rest his or her life, so that he or she can be successful in the choices he or she makes to better serve themselves, others, and their communities. I also hope for them to implement his or her life lessons or educational tools so much so, they have a “ripple effect” or “trickle down” effect.  The latter is how I feel I use sociology in my area of work.  

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? Yes, I actually further built my resume by working for two years, and then I went back for a Master’s degree in Social Work. Many of my classes were similar and overlapped with what I had previously studied. One grad school class even used the same textbooks as a previous undergrad class! I have always enjoyed lending a listening ear for people of all demographics. I am always willing to listen to people’s problems and thoughts, even though I may not be in a position to offer advice! I feel that often times, people of all demographics need someone to talk to. Many of the classes I had taken both as an undergrad and grad student helped me to better comprehend the need to hear his or her story, and again, therefore, better empathize.

DANIEL LATHAM

Why did you end up majoring in sociology?  Trial and error, really. I could never settle on a major, or one area of study that I was truly passionate about. After landing at McMurry, I declared a major in Psychology, minor in Sociology, and took my first intro courses. That was when I realized I had it backwards. Psychology, in those days, held you at arms' length with statistical analyses and reproductions of behavioral experiments -- very much delayed gratification. Sociology, meanwhile, dived right into the fun stuff. I loved the professors. They were young, inquisitive, enthusiastic, and absolutely not jaded. I switched minor to major within the first three weeks.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? Challenging, but not intimidating, and ultimately rewarding. There was a wealth of information to convey, but it was taught in an engaging way by a handful of professors who were genuinely excited by the topics they presented.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this?  No matter what path you take career-wise, you stand a big chance of working with people. Learning how people behave in groups - the dynamics of the workplace, family units, social groups, cultural influences - will clarify hidden motivations and make you a better, more well-rounded colleague. If it does spark a passion in the field, even better - sociological research drives progress in public policy and quality of life issues.

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work?  I am a Licensed Professional Counselor Intern working with students in a technical college environment; I also work part time as a psychotherapist intern in private practice. I use sociology every day, in that I am always looking at everything through that lens. I've never stopped. I am always pulling back to try to see the bigger picture, the context of daily interactions and my students' backgrounds to help me make sense of the world. It's become part of my identity. I believe this has made me a different kind of therapist, in that instead of focusing so much on the interior of my students and clients, I try to picture them in the context of their family, workplace, culture, and socioeconomic group, to better understand and relate to them that their behaviors are not always conscious choices. I don't do this to absolve anyone of personal responsibility -- I do this to explore people's motivations, and indirectly, my own.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor?   Ironically, I went into a psychological field. I obtained my Masters in Counseling from University of Texas - San Antonio. I am currently accruing hours toward a full licensure in counseling. I believe my Sociology degree made me a much better grad student. I examined existing research more critically, and produced better academic papers. Studying sociology sharpened my writing and demystified the process of qualitative research, in particular. But sociology has also made me a better thinker. I'm an even bigger news junkie than before. I'm also a smarter consumer. I can spot the inner workings of persuasive appeals, and manipulations in political advertising. It was the multifaceted way that sociology was presented at McMurry that made it continue to be relevant to my daily life.

LAUREN (EUBANKS) LEWIS

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I originally started my education at McMurry as a Christian Education major. Having no clue exactly what that meant or what I wanted to do with my life, aside from "I want to be a missionary in Africa!", that major sounded like as good a place to start as any. So, I pursued it. Within my freshman year, McMurry removed that major as an option and, as such, I was forced to reevaluate my options. I knew I wanted to do service work for my career and the description of the Sociology 101 class was intriguing to me, so I signed up for it. After less than a week of classes, I knew I'd found my niche. I began my path toward my degree in Sociology, with a minor in Religion. 

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry?  Attending a school where an academic department consists of two professors is unique enough. Add to this that both of these professors were so completely personable, knowledgeable, and attentive to my individual curiosities, questions, and struggles with the concepts being presented to me, and I couldn't help but be enthusiastic to learn. The class formats varied, but were almost never just another lecture. Often, they included discussions, debates, and even heated arguments amongst the students themselves, the professors playing the part of both the mediators and, occasionally, the instigators.... all with the goal of provoking thought. I never did learn by memorizing facts and spitting them back out at exam time. I don't think most of us do. We learn by being given some basic information and then comparing our thoughts and responses with those around us. In other words, Sociology taught me how to interact with the world around me.... and that lesson is still going. 

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? So many disciplines pull from sociology without even realizing that they do it. The terms that you will learn in the very first few classes, you will hear everywhere. Norms, values, taboos, roles in family/work/life, class systems, culture.... these are all terms that I remember from my very first sociology class. I like to bring to the attention of those around me that they are using sociological terms and they don't even realize it. Sociological education explains why we are the way we are and helps you form empathy for your fellow human. That will serve you, in life, no matter what occupation you choose or where you call home. 

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? I currently serve as a Volunteer Coordinator for Meals on Wheels San Antonio. In my role, I am responsible for 1,200 volunteers, who deliver meals to homebound seniors and the disabled in our community. At any point in my day, I may be talking to a college student who is volunteering for class service hours, the CEO of a major corporation who is delivering meals on their lunch hour, or an elderly client, who is hard of hearing and frustrated over their inability to read or properly fill out a food stamp application. Adaptability is the name of this game. The foundation that my sociological education provided for me allows me to assess circumstances quickly and adapt to change, as my audience and their individual needs do. Many people think they have this quality, but I can tell you from personal experience, it's not something you learn in biology or accounting class (much respect to those folks).  Adaptability comes from empathy. You have to KNOW that everyone comes from a different background, culture, and perspective formed by those things. Many in our world, unfortunately, hear such a statement and roll their eyes. A Sociologist hears it and nods in agreement of the importance of acknowledging those differences, respectfully, in our everyday interactions. 

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  I have not pursued a degree higher than my Bachelor's, nor do I have any plans to. I am thoroughly enjoying gaining knowledge through experience in the work that I do. I spent six years, right out of college, working in a homeless shelter. I loved working directly with those clients and they taught me SO MUCH.   More recently, I have moved over to working directly with volunteers and more indirectly with the clients that my agency serves. I love all of it because I love people.

ASHLEY (ROSS) MAYBERRY

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I took my first Intro to Sociology class after Intro to Psychology was not at all what I expected!  I fell in love with the influence of society on our behaviors, it all made sense and clicked to me.  

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? It was great - most of the classes were exciting and new to me. There were hands on projects and Dr. Wallace was fun! 

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? If they are at all interested in people I would say go for it.  How you and people in general react to a situation is so much more than the chemicals in your brain and it was interesting to study and learn about those influences. 

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? I am the Health and Wellness Director/ Associate Executive Director at the Plainview YMCA.  I use sociology everyday.  So many people come through our building and each one is different, it is so fun to study them to see what makes them click.  My main job is to encourage others to be healthier in mind, body and spirit and developing relationships with them helps in that part of the job.  One of my favorite questions is "What is your story?"

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? I have not in higher education setting.  I have been to many trainings with the jobs I have been a part of, whether it was the YMCA or my prior job of working for Child Protective Services.  I hold several different exercise certifications.

REID MILLER

Why did you end up majoring in sociology?While attending a the University of North Texas I took a Sociology class and did well in it; than at a later date when I decided to work for CPS it seemed like a good fit.  Oh and I have always been very poor at math.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? I thoroughly enjoyed it; your lectures were actually quite interesting.  Also you somehow managed to put the concept of changing paradigms in society (past and present) into terms even I could understand.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? It's a degree plan that allows you to do a lot of different things; I chose to become involved in Social Work but with this degree I could have gone on to work in any number of fields.  Business, Government, Journalism, politics, public relations or even retail management (if one is a masochist).    

I am the Program Director for Contracts for what we refer to as the Northwest District of CPS.  My staff work to establish and manage contracts with Community Professionals to provide services for Child Protective Services clients in DFPS Regions 1 (Amarillo/Lubbock), 2 (Abilene/Wichita Falls), 9 Midland/San Angelo) and 10 (El Paso). 

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? Sadly I have not.  But I am not dead yet and my kids are growing up so you never know.  A sociology Degree offers a strong Liberal Arts background so I could go back to school and try to get away from working for the state.

DUSTIN NICKERSON

Why did you end up majoring in sociology?   I majored in sociology for two reasons. First, I have always been fascinated with learning about what makes people "tick." Since the study of sociology encompasses pretty much every aspect of life that affects people, majoring in sociology was a natural fit for me. The second reason that I majored in sociology is because I wanted a career in which I could help people. Since obtaining a sociology degree opens up the door to many careers in the social work sector, sociology was the logical path for me.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry?   Through my experience studying sociology, I was able to learn how to view the world in a different way than most. I learned to see the social in the individual, and find patterns in the randomness of the world, or what my professors called the "sociological traits." I believe these traits have allowed me to view the world with a deeper understanding of humanity than many people have.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this?   For students considering sociology as a major, they should consider that there are a wide rage of highly interesting subjects covered within the field. I have met many students who were non-sociology majors, that took a sociology class and stated that it was one of the best and most interesting courses they took in college. A degree in sociology also offers many rewarding job opportunities in the social work field, and other sectors,

What is your current occupation? How are you using sociology in your work?  I am currently working at a local MHMR where I use the education I received from my sociology degree on a daily basis. In working in the mental health sector, I treat a wide range of clients from different socioeconomic backgrounds. Studying sociology has helped me to better serve these many different populations.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education? If so, discuss the area you pursued. How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor?  I am currently applying to Graduate school, hoping to obtain a Masters of Sociology/social work degree. Obtaining my Bachelors in sociology was the prefect prerequisite degree for this endeavor. 

KARLA (SANTOS) REYES

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I majored in Sociology because I have always been interested to learn how human activity is affected by a person’s social surroundings. I always want to know why people do what they do. As a child, I remember visiting 2 of my little cousins at a children’s shelter. I remember feeling so sad and anxious about being in there. I couldn’t believe that some parents were so irresponsible to the point where they could lose their children. My parents ended up fostering my 2 cousins and that’s when I knew I wanted to grow up to help children in similar situations. Later on in life, I learned that I could do that with a Sociology major.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? I had such a great experience at McMurry. All of my professors really cared about me as a person. I wasn’t just another student sitting in their classroom. I learned a lot of new things and I wanted to be in class. The lectures were always so interesting and the professors were always so engaged with the students.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? He or she should major in Sociology because the course content is very intriguing and practical at the same time. There are many potential career options with a degree in Sociology. In addition, the professors are engaged with the students and classes are very engaging and it’s a fun atmosphere to be in.   

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? I am currently working as a Physician Business Manager for WellMed in San Antonio, TX. I work with physicians who are not employed by WellMed and also recruit new physicians to join our network. WellMed is focused on Senior Healthcare therefore, I use my Sociology background when meeting with potential new patients and/or physicians. It has provided me with the skills I need in working with diverse people.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? I graduated with a Master’s in Business Administration in 2010. My BA in Sociology provided me with the knowledge and skills I needed to pursue a graduate degree. Sociology taught me a lot of the basics of human interaction and relationships which I greatly used in my managerial and corporate professional classes.

STEVEN REDONDO

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I originally wanted to be a government major but political science was the next closest subject; however, a cursory look at the political science curriculum and/or classes gave me the impression that it would be more of an exposition on government from the top - down. I had been working for the State of Texas, as a correctional officer, and I thought a bottom - up curriculum would act as sort of vocational program that I could possibly parlay with my present occupation, the sociology degree program with classes on "Social Problems" "White Collar Crime" and "Criminology" embraced all of those academic priorities for me at the time.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? Humbling. I went into my junior year an arrogant, ardent supporter of the political right-wing, and I carried all of the preconceived notions about the economic stratification in America, and more importantly why the affluent and working classes were entrenched in their socioeconomic positions. I was a merit-based believer, and make no mistake, I had my guard up the entire time. Because I, like many others, had been groomed on talk-radio and the likes of Fox News, it was every Republican's duty to beware that the "Halls of higher-learning" were Liberal and intent on indoctrinating the minds with communism and socialism. Consequently, that omen appeared on my first, my first class: Dr. J. Simpson, proffered an argument about the 1% who held 95% of the wealth in America and I almost changed my major that day to political science. I had found her assertion so absurd and so belittling that I spent the next three semesters trying to refute it. The irony is that the literature, much of which were published by political scientists, supported the nation's social stratification as it existed, as being typical of other countries. In retrospect, my experience at McMurry was more of me fighting the tenets of the sociology curriculum with all my energy, and the instructors - Dr. Wallace, Simpson, Hollingsworth - supporting me the whole way. There would be no fight. It was only when I left McMurry did I realize that there was not right or wrong about the learning process; learning was more of a contribution in a process of argumentation. My core beliefs which I asserted were challenged, defended, refuted, and then refined. I don't think I would have ever found that understanding had I not joined the sociology department at McMurry.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? It’s the key to "The Matrix": the infrastructure to any field of endeavor whether it be related to school, work, or play, and because all three of those fields are a strata of human organization its essential to navigate from a group perspective. Want individual success? It's synonymous with achievement at the group level. Sociology's chief concern is patterns of group behavior; therefore, why not navigate, most optimally, through the layers of social class - which are real barriers of exclusivity held by the most powerful groups - with a course of study that is actually relevant to the shark-infested waters of today's society?    

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? Correctional Officer. Prison is a society with its own cultural norms, beliefs, and politics; to survive as a member, or as gatekeeper per se, one must conform to the group behavior and that means understanding the powers of race, class, and Groupthink. Some of the courses of study, "social problems" and "criminology" were two, play out for me everyday in textbook fashion. At times, sociology wasn't just a major, it was an explanation for what I was seeing everyday, and it helped prevent numerous would-be altercations -that I had attributed beforehand to individual attitude - by appreciating first and foremost the rigors of socialization that certain offenders were undergoing in the prison setting.  

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? No. The constraints of paying student loans has not made it feasible to further my education at this time.

JOAQUIN RUEDA

Why did you end up majoring in sociology?In all honesty it was purely by chance. I was originally a Criminal Justice major but after several discussions with Dr. Wallace and Professor Penton I saw that it might be to narrow and limit my growing potential.  Sociology was the complete opposite.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? It was fantastic!  I would not trade it for anything else. The professors are and were amazing, they took the time to teach and elaborate on each specific subject matter in depth so it could be fully understood. Additionally I have kept in contact with Dr. Robert Wallace since my graduation in 1995. What other Alumni of any University or College can say that? None! McMurry has the advantage that the students are not just taught they are integrated into the McMurry Community of which all the professors are eager to impart their knowledge and experience onto them.

Let's say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this?I would highly recommend it. It is a very broad field that can lead you into many paths; whether it is Criminal Justice, Social Work, Counseling, Pre-Law, Public Health, Sociology as a science can guide you and help you attain your goals. Sociology is a Highway that connects you with the areas of work & study that interest you.  It does not box you in or confine you in a certain science.

What is your current occupation? How are you using sociology in your work? I am currently the Assistance Officer In Charge of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Quarantine Stations in El Paso and San Diego.  Furthermore I am currently deployed in West Africa for the Ebola Response. Thanks to my studies at McMurry and my degree in Sociology I have been able to respond to Hurricane Katrina, be involved with Land Border response to H5N1 Novel Influenza, H1N1 Novel Influenza as well as develop many Nation Wide Table Top Exercises and Full Scale Exercises that reach across all levels of Local, State and Federal Government. I use Sociology in my work daily.  As a Public Health Advisor it is my responsibility to not only interact with my partner agencies but with the public as well and Sociology has given me the scope to be able to interact with them and utilize the sociological theories and obtain positive results.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education? If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor?No, I've not furthered my education; I have been able to achieve all with just my B.A. in Sociology from McMurry University.

MEGAN SCHWEIGERT

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I majored in sociology because of my fascination of people. I've always loved airports and people watching. I discovered I want to know more about why people interact the way they do. Relationships/break ups, social mobility, crime, theories and research very much intrigued me.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? My experience of studying sociology at McMurry was phenomenal. I had a great selection of courses to choose from, and I was encouraged to do more than typical school work; I was encouraged to do an honors thesis and was able to co-author a paper with a professor in undergraduate studies. That's pretty cool, and a rare opportunity!

Let's say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? Having studied sociology, I'm pleased I was able to get to know the professors, and get the individual guidance I needed to fully comprehend everything we studied. I would encourage a prospective sociology major at McMurry to know in advance you will be getting a smaller, more focused program, with extremely well-versed professors.

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? My occupation is an investigator of abuse and neglect cases for Child Protective Services (Department of Family and Protective Services). I use an abundance of the material covered in sociology for my job, since so much of the job requires communication with and understanding of people from diverse backgrounds, upbringings, cultures, gender roles, financial statuses, and other various and subtle milieux that must be factored into determining whether abuse/neglect has occurred to a child.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? I, personally, was strongly encouraged to complete graduate studies in sociology. This is actually still part of my plan, though I have taken time to get into the workforce. Continuing education in sociology is definitely still a priority to me; I feel that my education at McMurry has prepared me for grad school and to be an empowered mind in the sociological stage of educators, theorists, and authors. It is because of my love for McMurry's sociology program, I hope one day to be a contributing force in creating a graduate program for sociology at McMurry.

JEFF SCOTT

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? Good fortune led me to study sociology at McMurry. As a freshman I had yet to declare a major. Dr. Robert Wallace, the charismatic (Weber!) chair of the sociology department, just happened to be my assigned faculty advisor, and he nudged me to consider becoming a sociology major.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? In a word – transformative! I went through an exciting 4-year discovery process, learning how to expand and use my “sociological imagination”. I developed the ability to comprehend complex social forces and interpret connections between private troubles and public issues. 

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? In my view majoring in sociology provides the best centerpiece to a fine liberal arts education. The sociology curriculum at McMurry underscored what I learned in literature, history, political science, economics, and religion courses. 

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? I am a professor at the University of Cincinnati in the School of Social Work. I heavily depend on my sociology training in conducting research and teaching in the area of social welfare policy analysis and advocacy. In particular, political sociology, with its emphasis on the imbalances of American democracy, is vital to the work I do.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? I went on to the University of Illinois and pursued advanced degrees in social work.  I specialized in macro social work, practiced in community and government settings for the purpose of systems change. My sociology background was a great advantage, as a solid understanding of social theory and research methods separated me from other classmates. Accordingly, I was afforded the opportunity to work on meaningful projects with some very accomplished faculty members.

VONDA SILLS

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I actually planned on social work, but McMurry didn't offer that...so I took my $8500 scholarship and went with Sociology!

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? I ABSOLUTELY loved it! I was challenged to reach my highest potential, and enjoyed every moment of it. The professors of Sociology at McMurry were my greatest cheerleaders during my time there!

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? Sociology will broaden your mind to the world we live in...you will learn to recognize things around you that you have always just seen as the "norm"...and then you will want to change it.

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? I work for The Department of Family & Protective Services. I use my sociology degree to see all sides of each case that comes in, from race to socioeconomic status 

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor?  I have yet to further my education, but look forward to the day I can.

  

FIONA SMITH

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I attended Cisco Junior College right out of high school in August of 2005; I knew that I enjoyed working with children and that I needed to establish a college major so I chose education. I pursed and completed my junior college course work then transferred to McMurry in 2007. After the transfer I was automatically enrolled in general education courses which included several elementary education courses. While enrolled in those classes I quickly realized that elementary education was no longer my field of interest I desired classes that challenged my thinking and my personal views. My grades reflected the lack of interest, and I knew that I needed to change my field of study. At the end of that fall semester I spoke with Melanie Long (student advisor), explained my academic situation and I informed her that I was looking to change my major. I read through the course guide several times and I felt drawn to establish my major as sociology with a minor in psychology.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? My personal experience studying sociology was absolutely phenomenal. When I enrolled in my first sociology course (Introduction to Sociology), I enjoyed every moment of class and I hated for the lessons to come to an end. My grades began to positively reflect the intellectual tests that sociology provided; I was forced to “think outside of the box” on a daily basis and challenge the thinking of others around me. Each semester became more challenging and I was eager to absorb all that my sociology professors instructed. The level of abstract thinking and sociological concepts captivated my attention with each class session. Within Dr. Hollingsworth’s course we were instructed to conduct a “Social Norm Violation” project; where we were instructed to observe societies response to an event. That particular project was fun and at the same time intriguing as I silently observed societies response. I will never forget that educational experience. Each professor (Wallace, Hollingsworth, and Narvaez) was highly attentive to the needs of their sociology students, they all desired for us to succeed, and they did whatever it took to make that a reality. They were very supportive, and encouraging throughout my journey to McMurry graduation and beyond. 

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? I would say to a student if they were interested in majoring in sociology, “Go for it!” The career opportunities are limitless and the depths of class discussions are mind opening. The way you think and see society as a whole will be forever altered, so be prepared to think on a deeper level and become an observer. A few career paths that an individual may seek after completing their bachelors degree may include: social work, counseling, child protective services, working with individuals who suffer from mental disabilities, become a researcher, business, government jobs, adult or juvenile corrections, college administration, private or public education, human services, health services, federal work, and non-profit work just to name a few. I successfully completed my degree in sociology and have not regretted that I established it as my major.

What is your current occupation? How are you using sociology in your work? Current Occupation: Primary Prevention Specialist Job Description: Community Education- delivery of primary prevent education in school (ages: 3 years -18 years). Training- facilitates staff and volunteer training in family violence. Assist with fundraisers, resource fairs, and other community events. Conduct speaking presentations on domestic (family) violence. Develop and revise primary prevention curricula and programs to be used in schools. Develop and maintain records for volunteer activities and applications. Distribute and collect presenter evaluations Employer: Noah Project Inc. (Taylor County’s Family Violence Center) Employment Date: June 1, 2013 Using Sociology in my field of work: In my field of work I have utilized the following sociological concepts: social behavior, social order, social disorder, and social change. I have done research about domestic (family) violence, interpersonal violence, the psychological and emotional effects of domestic violence on children, and the effects of domestic violence on the community. I have given presentations within the community about domestic violence, and interpersonal violence in order to increase awareness about these events that are taking place so often within Taylor County. Noah Project services 10 surrounding counties, therefore we as a non-profit agency have taken the initiative to heighten awareness and assistance for the rural counties as well. Our primary prevention and community awareness departments’ main focus is to shed light about the silent epidemic of domestic violence in order to promote social change and a cultural shift within our society.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education? If so, discuss the area you pursued. How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? Yes, after graduating from McMurry in May of 2010; I began the Masters of Education in Counseling and Human Development program at Hardin-Simmons University in June of 2010. This particular program allowed me the opportunity to further my social science knowledge. The program prepares students for counselor positions in a vast variety of settings including public and private school, as well as human services settings. My sociology degree provided me with the foundation to better understand my department’s graduate level course work. I am truly grateful for my senior level research class instructed by Dr. Robert Wallace, when it came time for my graduate level research class I was well prepared to conduct extensive research on a designated topic.  After completed the Counseling and Human Development program in December of 2011; I tested for my LPC (Licensed Profession Counselor) credential in October of 2012 and passed the examination. At this present moment I am pursing my 3000 hour LPC internship under the supervision of my LPC supervisor.

JOANN THOMAS

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? After taking introduction to Sociology I was hooked on the major. Having the opportunity to study and explore social behavior under the guidance of the McM team was fabulous.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? The Sociology department at McMurry was fantastic, and provided lots of guidance. Team members went above and beyond their job descriptions for all students. Although the program requirements were somewhat standard, the diversity of the team members provided for a more tailored program.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? Sociology provides the opportunity to understand social behavior and relationships, and is a skill needed in every field of study.  Every major serves a purpose and is valuable in our system, but the concepts and theories learned in sociology are very unique. For example, great administrators or supervisors will state that they would rather hirer a person lacking on the job skills, but have the social and relationship skills needed to be successful. Faculty members wanted input and feedback from the student body. Class sessions were spent learning the material but also exploring the life experiences that students had.

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? My current position is a Middle School Reading teacher. In the near future my goal is to transition into the Behavior Specialist team under the Special Education department of Education. Having the background in Sociology helps with understanding the developmental level of my students, and the interactions that exhibit extreme changes on a daily basis.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? I received a Masters in Social Work from the University of Texas Arlington, and currently a Licensed Master Level Social Worker. Having the BA in Sociology did assist with the entrance into the MSSW program because of the social science background. The letters of recommendation from the team members at McMurry, also played a huge role in acceptance to the program. Sociology also gave me a head start with concepts and theories outlined in the MSSW program, and eliminated some anxiety and fear associated with graduate school.

JENNIFER WELLS

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I majored in sociology because of the broad array of cultural prospectives. The classes where always interesting, and the professors always seemed enthusiastic about their courses. I've personally always been interested about the way people and society interact, and the different social dynamics that occur.  My main purpose for choosing sociology was to study criminology.  Criminology was by far my favorite area of study.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? My experience in studying sociology at McMurry was great. The skills and knowledge I acquired gave me extremely helpful insight into analyzing issues from different perspectives in law school. My experience with the sociology department were second to none and absolutely invaluable.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? I would tell prospective sociology students not to hesitate in choosing this field of study. Not only would they get a great, well rounded, and focused education, but they would never be bored. The professors and the material will keep them interested, engaged, and impassioned, which sorry to say cannot be said for every discipline. Also, a sociology degree offers a broad enough focus that it is useful in great deal of career areas. 

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor?  My sociology degree and professors were instrumental in my attending law school at SMU upon graduating for McMurry. Currently I am working part-time awaiting my July Texas Bar exam results. I can honestly say that sociology came in use during law school, especially in family law, child law, and criminal law classes.  Specifically, I chose to work with the Innocence Project of Texas due to the influence of my time at McMurry. 

RUBEN ZENDEJAS

Why did you end up majoring in sociology? I ended up majoring in sociology, because I became interested in the field of study after I took a introduction to Sociology course at a community college. The Professor was real passionate about the subject and what we were learning about I could apply to my everyday life.

How would you describe your experience of studying sociology at McMurry? Majoring in Sociology at McMurry was the best educational decision that I have made, the professors were extremely helpful and the classes were insightful and encourage participation in class lectures and debates.  Also, my classmates seemed really involved in what was going on during semesters that provided a great learning environment. The sociology courses along with the criminology courses are what have influenced my decision in career path, because I enjoyed learning about how our society works I now see the world in a different way then when I first came to McMurry.

Let’s say you run into a McMurry student who is interested in majoring in sociology. Why should he or she do this? If you are interested in Majoring in Sociology, I would highly recommend it if you want a major where you are excited to go to class and where you leave class really feeling like you have learned something. You will walk out of the classroom everyday and see the world in a different way. No two classes are the same and the Professors are always willing to guide you down the right path and offer any assistance if needed.

What is your current occupation?  How are you using sociology in your work? I am a police officer in California. The Sociology and Criminology courses that I took play a significant role in my position as a police officer.  Learning about the different social forces (races, genders, cultures, religions) and the motivating factors of why people commit crime allows me to apply what I have learned into my area of work, and not only gives me an advantage, but lets me thrive in my career.

Since graduating from McMurry, have you furthered your education?  If so, discuss the area you pursued.  How did your sociology degree help with this endeavor? I have not yet furthered my education since graduating from McMurry, however, I will pursue my Masters degree once I get settled into my career. Getting my Masters has been one of my goals since graduating. McMurry has given me the confidence to pursue higher education as well as pursue my career path.