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Courses


1340: General Psychology
Designed as a course for anyone interested in psychology. Is required for all psychology majors, minors, and nursing majors, and is optional for the General Education Requirement for Personal and Global Perspectives. This course is an overview of the scientific study of factors underlying human and animal behavior. Topics include physiological bases of behavior, learning, development, personality theories, social interaction, psychological disorders, and therapy. (Fall, Spring)

2360: Developmental Psychology: The Human Life Cycle
Prerequisites: None. Designed as a course for anyone interested in psychology. Course is required for psychology, and nursing majors, and is an elective for all others . This course is an introduction to the individual’s personal development and change throughout the life span. (Fall, Spring)

3301: Principles of Learning
Prerequisite: PSYC 1340. An elective for psychology majors and minors. This course is a survey of the research, principles, and theories of human learning. Topics include, classical and operant conditioning, cognitive and social learning theories and motivation. (Fall)

3305: Research Methods and Statistics I
Prerequisite: MATH 1311 or equivalent. The first of a required two course sequence, this course is an integrated survey of the basic methods and statics employed in social and behavioral science research. This course emphasizes the link between common research methodologies and the elementary statistics used to describe and interpret results. Topics include; the philosophy of science and the scientific method, the ethics of social research, validity and reliability, sampling, and creating and using tests surveys and objective measures. (Fall)

3306: Research Methods and Statistics II
Prerequisites: MATH 1311 or equivalent, PSYC 3305. The second of a required two course sequence, this course is an integrated survey of the basic methods and statistics employees in social and behavioral science research. This course emphasizes the link between common research methodologies and the elementary statistics used to describe and interpret results. Topics include descriptive statistics, correlation, experimental and quasi experimental designs, single participant experiments and longitudinal studies, and research with categorical data. (Spring)

3320: Personality Psychology
Prerequisite: PSYC 1340. Counts as an elective for all psychology majors and minors. This course involves a detailed investigation of the processes responsible for normal and abnormal personality formation. Topics include contemporary and historical models of personality, their assumptions, structures, research methods, assessment techniques, and findings. (Fall)

3330: Multicultural Psychology
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340, three additional advanced hours in psychology, and junior or senior standing. This course is designed as an upper level elective for psychology majors, minors and other interested students. This course will explore the psychosocial concept of culture and its elements as well as cross-cultural interactions. Topics include: ethnocentrism and cultural relativism; interaction of culture, language and thought; constructing emotions and identities in different cultures; life stages and rites of passage in different cultures; family structure in different cultures (monogamy vs. polygamy); cannibalism and violence; the role of reciprocity, and cultural contact. (Spring)

3340: Social Psychology
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340 or SOC 2300. (Cross-listed as SOC 3340) An elective course for all psychology majors and minors. This course is a survey of the ways in which interpersonal events and cultural forces can affect attitudes, social learning, perception, and communication by the individual and the group. (Fall, Spring)

3350: Psychology and Christianity Seminar
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340, three additional advanced hours in psychology, and junior or senior standing. This course is designed as an upper level elective for psychology majors and minors. This course will compare and contrast the worldview assumptions of prominent secular and Christian psychological thinkers. Topics explored within this framework include revelation and science, faith and belief, morality and the nature of humanity, sex and love, suffering and death. (Fall)

3382: Positive Psychology and Mental Health
Prerequisite: PSYC 1340. Intended as an elective for majors and minors in psychology. This course is a study of the prevention and correction of maladjustment and 137 the development of the wholesome personality. Strong emphasis is placed on the contributions that the behavioral sciences make to the understanding of the individual. (Spring)

3385: Gerontology
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340 and 2360 or permission of instructor. Intended as an elective for majors and minors in psychology who have an interest in learning about and working with the elderly. This course involves a study of the aging process, including the physical, psychological, and social influences on aging. It includes an analysis of the services available and needed by the elderly. (Spring odd years)

3390: Psychopharmacology
Prerequisite: PSYC 1340. Intended as an elective for psychology majors and minors who are interested in the role of chemicals in influencing behavior. This course studies the relationships among most common drugs, biochemical processes of the central nervous system, and behavior. The common uses of these drugs in various clinical and medical therapies, substance abuse, and treatment methods are also stressed. (As needed)

4300: Abnormal Psychology
Perequisites: PSYC 1340 and junior or senior standing. This course is designed for all persons with an interest in psychological disorders and is an upper level elective for psychology minors, but is required for majors. This course is concerned with an analysis of maladaptive behavior including mood, anxiety, psychotic, and personality disorders, as well as substance abuse, somatoform disorders, brain dysfunction, and dissociative disorders. Classification, etiology, prevention, and treatment of abnormal behaviors are also examined. (Fall, Spring)

4315: Psychological Tests and Measurements
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340, three additional advanced hours in psychology, and junior or senior standing. Intended for those students who seek training in administering and evaluating psychological tests. It is an upper level elective for psychology majors intended for those students who seek an introduction to the administration and evaluation of psychological tests. This course is designed as a survey of a wide variety of group and individual psychological tests. Students administer, score, and interpret selected tests. Topics include test validity, reliability, objectivity, standardization, and meaning of tests and measurements in psychological and educational settings. (Spring)

4320: Psychology of the Criminal Mind
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340, three additional advanced hours in psychology, and junior or senior standing. Intended for all students with an interest in psychology and criminal justice. An upper level elective for psychology majors and minors, and all other interested students. This course is designed to provide the student biological, psychological, and sociocultural theoretical explanations for criminal behavior. Research findings and the treatment and handling of criminals from a mental health perspective are examined. Emphasis is placed on understanding the behavior and thought processes of psychopaths. The use of mental health professionals within the criminal justice system is also discussed. (Fall even years)

4330: History and Systems of Psychology
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340, three additional advanced hours in Psychology, and junior or senior standing. An upper level elective for psychology majors and minors. This course investigates the historical development of systems and theories of psychology, emphasizing both the continuity of ideas and the changes in those ideas as psychology has evolved. Various historical and contemporary schools of thought in psychology are examined. (As needed)

4341: Physiological Psychology
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340, BIOL 1401 or equivalent, and junior or senior standing. Designed for the psychology or biology student with an interest in how biological function influences behavior. This course examines the processes by which biological factors influence human and animal behavior. Special emphasis is placed on the effects of the brain,  eurotransmitters, hormones, and genetics on learning, memory, motivation, sensation, and abnormal behavior. (Spring)

4365: Death and Dying
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340. This course is designed for all students with an interest in understanding death processes. An upper level elective for psychology majors and minors. This course is a study of the social and psychological impact of dying, death, and bereavement. Students are provided the opportunity to explore their own feelings about death and dying and to develop professional skills for working with dying and grieving persons. (Spring even years)

4370: Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340, three additional advanced hours in psychology, and junior or senior standing. Designed as an upper level elective for psychology majors, minors, and business students. This course studies the application of the principles of individual and group psychology to persons in the workplace and other organizational settings. Topics include behavioral measurement, personnel selection and training, job satisfaction, and human factors in job design. (Spring even years)

4375: Clinical and Counseling Psychology
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340, psyc 4300, three additional advanced hours in psychology, and junior or senior standing. Designed as an upper level elective for psychology majors and minors. This course is a survey of the psychodiagnostic procedures, methods for individual and group counseling and psychotherapy, and effectiveness of various treatments used by clinical and counseling psychologists in the field of mental health. (Fall odd years)

4388: Internship in Psychology
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340, 6 advanced hours in psychology coursework, and junior or senior standing. Intended as an upper level elective for psychology majors. A pre-approved and supervised work experience designed to supplement academic training. Students work 150 hours at a local agency and attend supervisory meetings. Interested stu dents should discuss this course with the psychology faculty by October 1 for spring semester placement and by March 1 for summer or fall semester placement. This is an experience-enriched course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

4392: Senior Seminar in Psychology
Prerequisites: Senior standing, and fifteen hours in psychology or approval by the Chairperson of the department. Required for all psychology majors. This course is designed to stimulate critical thinking and initiate debate on a number of diverse controversial issues in psychology. The emphasis is on explaining different theoretical approaches to psychological issues and how they can be integrated into a conceptual whole. Students take a locally prepared departmental exam and the Major Field Achievement Test (MFAT) in Psychology as part of this course. These tests are considered in students’ final grade. This course is designated as the capstone course in psychology. (Fall)

4X95: Independent Studies (variable credit)
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340, six additional advanced hours in psychology, and junior or senior standing. An upper level elective for psychology majors and minors. This is an advanced study or research program arranged between an advanced student and an instructor to provide intensive study of a particular area of interest. The course includes a definition of goals appropriate for the advanced student, ways of attaining those goals, a schedule for frequent consultation, and means of measuring progress. No more than three semester hours can be approved in Independent Studies. (by arrangement)

4X96*: Honors Tutorial (variable credit)
Prerequisites: 15 hours in psychology and admission to the departmental honors program. Designed to challenge unusually gifted students in psychology. This course provides opportunities for investigation into a variety of psychological topics. It can be taken concurrently with an upper level psychology course or as a separate independent study. This is an experience-enriched course. (By arrangement)

4397*: Honors Thesis
Prerequisites: 15 hours in psychology, admission to the departmental honors program, and approval of the topic by the department and the Honors Committee. This course will provide an opportunity for a student to pursue an in-depth analysis of some contemporary approach to a topic in psychology and write a comprehensive review paper on the findings (25-50 pages). There must also be an oral presentation of this material to an appropriate audience. Honors graduates must successfully complete either Honors Thesis or Honors Research. This is an experience-enriched course and the capstone course for the honors program in Psychology. (By arrangement)

4398*: Honors Research
Prerequisites: 15 hours in psychology, admission to the departmental honors program, and approval of the topic by the department and the Honors Committee. This course will provide an opportunity for a student to pursue an original research topic under the direction of a faculty member from the Department of Psychology. There must be a written report (25-50 pages) of the research findings in a form suitable for publication. There must also be an oral presentation of this material to an appropriate audience. Honors graduates must successfully complete either Honors Research or Honors Thesis. This is an experience-enriched course and the capstone course for the honors program in Psychology. (By arrangement)

XX99: Special Topics (variable credit)
Prerequisites: PSYC 1340, three additional advanced hours in psychology, and junior or senior standing. An elective for psychology majors, minors, and other interested students. Courses of this nature are infrequent on unique topics of study offered occasionally to groups of students to broaden departmental curriculum, to meet student demand, or to observe special events. Courses of this type may be repeated once for credit when the topics vary. (Fall, Spring, Summer)


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For More Information Contact

Dr. Greg Schneller, Chair
Department of Psychology
McMurry University
1 McMurry University #86
Abilene, TX 79697

Office: Old Main 305C
Phone: (325) 793-4619
Email: schneller.greg@mcm.edu